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Save public television group plans to hold public meeting

Wednesday, February 23, 2000

By Post-Gazette Staff Writer Barbara Vancheri and TV editor Rob Owen

The Save Pittsburgh Public TV campaign, which has been fighting a sale or swap of Channel 16 for four years, will meet at 5 p.m. tomorrow to discuss its next move. The session, at the Community of Reconciliation at Bellefield and Fifth avenues in Oakland, will include speakers and open discussion.

Expected to talk are: Linda Wambaugh, campaign co-chair; Rick Adams from the Alliance for Progressive Action; and Dennis Brutus, professor emeritus of the Department of African Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. The public is invited to attend.

The future of WQEX is in play because of the collapse of a complicated deal involving WQED, Cornerstone TeleVision and Paxson Communications.

That plan fell apart when Cornerstone pulled out. WQED has yet to reveal what it will do next.



BACK IN BLACK: If you're watching KDKA-TV today, you might notice all the anchors and reporters dressed in black. There's a reason.

According to Mark Wirick, executive director of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists local, the black attire is to protest KDKA management's refusal to make AFTRA a contract offer. The last contract expired in September 1998.



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